FEB
24
2016
Model–View–Controller (MVC)
by Vahé Karamian
Model–view–controller (MVC) is a software architectural pattern mostly (but not exclusively) for implementing user interfaces on computers. It divides a given software application into three interconnected parts, so as to separate internal representations of information from the ways that information is presented to or accepted from the user.
Traditionally used for desktop graphical user interfaces (GUIs), this architecture has become extremely popular for designing web applications.
MVC was one of the seminal insights in the early development of graphical user interfaces, and one of the first approaches to describe and implement software constructs in terms of their responsibilities.
Trygve Reenskaug introduced MVC into Smalltalk-76 while visiting the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) in the 1970s. In the 1980s, Jim Althoff and others implemented a version of MVC for the Smalltalk-80 class library. It was only later, in a 1988 article in The Journal of Object Technology (JOT), that MVC was expressed as a general concept.
The MVC pattern has subsequently evolved, giving rise to variants such as hierarchical model–view–controller (HMVC), model–view–adapter (MVA), model–view–presenter (MVP), model–view–viewmodel (MVVM), and others that adapted MVC to different contexts.
The use of the MVC pattern in web applications exploded in popularity after the introduction of Apple's WebObjects which was originally written in Objective-C (that borrowed heavily from Smalltalk) and helped enforce MVC principles. Later, the MVC pattern became popular with Java developers when WebObjects was ported to Java. Later frameworks for Java such as Spring continued the strong bond between Java and MVC. The introduction of the frameworks Rails (for Ruby) and Django (for Python), both of which had a strong emphasis on rapid deployment, increased MVCs popularity outside the traditional enterprise environment in which it has long been popular. MVC web frameworks now hold large market shares relative to non-MVC web toolkits.
Use In Web Applications
Although originally developed for desktop computing, model–view–controller has been widely adopted as an architecture for World Wide Web applications in major programming languages. Several commercial and noncommercial web frameworks have been created that enforce the pattern. These software frameworks vary in their interpretations, mainly in the way that the MVC responsibilities are divided between the client and server.
Early web MVC frameworks took a thin client approach that placed almost the entire model, view and controller logic on the server. This is still reflected in popular frameworks such as Ruby on Rails, Django, ASP.NET MVC and Express. In this approach, the client sends either hyperlink requests or form input to the controller and then receives a complete and updated web page (or other document) from the view; the model exists entirely on the server. As client technologies have matured, frameworks such as AngularJS, EmberJS, JavaScriptMVC and Backbone have been created that allow the MVC components to execute partly on the client.
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FEB 24
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